Six Not-so-easy Pieces

Six Not-so-easy Pieces

Einstein's Relativity, Symmetry, and Space-time

Book - 1997
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Baker & Taylor
Explores vectors, symmetry in physical laws, the special theory of relativity, relativistic energy and momentum, space-time, and curved space

Perseus Publishing
No twentieth-century American scientist is better known to a wider spectrum of people than Richard P. Feynman (1918–1988)—physicist, teacher, author, and cultural icon. His autobiographies and biographies have been read and enjoyed by millions of readers around the world, while his wit and eccentricities have made him the subject of TV specials and even a theatrical film.The spectacular reception of the book and audio versions of Feynman’s Six Easy Pieces (published in 1995) resulted in a worldwide clamor for “More Feynman! More Feynman!” The outcome is these six additional lectures, drawn from the celebrated three-volume Lectures on Physics. Though slightly more challenging than the first six, these lectures are more focused, delving into the most revolutionary discovery in twentieth-century physics: Einstein’s Theory of Relativity.No single breakthrough in twentieth-century physics (with the possible exception of quantum mechanics) changed our view of the world more than that of Einstein’s discovery of relativity. The notions that the flow of time is not a constant, that the mass of an object depends on its velocity, and that the speed of light is a constant no matter what the motion of the observer, at first seemed shocking to scientists and laymen alike. But, as Feynman shows so clearly and so entertainingly in the lectures chosen for this volume, these crazy notions are no mere dry principles of physics, but are things of beauty and elegance. No one—not even Einstein himself—explained these difficult, anti-intuitive concepts more clearly, or with more verve and gusto, than Richard Feynman.

The spectacular reception of the book and audio versions of Feynman’s Six Easy Pieces (published in 1995) resulted in a worldwide clamor for “More Feynman! More Feynman!” The outcome is these six additional lectures, drawn from the celebrated three-volume Lectures on Physics. Though slightly more challenging than the first six, these lectures are more focused, delving into the most revolutionary discovery in twentieth-century physics: Einstein’s Theory of Relativity.


Book News
Six "easy" pieces were published in 1995. Now the publisher has dipped back into Feynman's three-volume Lectures on Physics to present these somewhat less accessible lectures. While the previous six-piece collection tackled various subjects, this volume deals only with Einstein's theory of relativity. Suitable for students and determined lay readers who want to learn from the master teacher, renowned not only for his scientific contributions, but for his wit, and the immediacy and clarity of his explanations. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Baker
& Taylor

In the spirit of Six Easy Pieces, this collection presents six additional focused, revolutionary lectures on Einstein's Theory of Relativity, which the legendary teacher and Nobel physicist Richard P. Feynman gave in the early 1960s to freshman students at Caltech.

Publisher: Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley Pub., [1997]
Copyright Date: ©1997
ISBN: 9780201150254
0201150255
9780201328424
0201328429
Branch Call Number: 530.11 F53
Characteristics: xxvii, 152 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm

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dbedn
Jun 15, 2017

I think not so easy pieces does sum it up nicely. Feynman makes use of some fine analogies to introduce some really tough topics and then goes into the actual discussions. I improved my understanding of most of the topics, but 4 dimensional curved space-time did me in.

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1aa
Apr 08, 2015

The formulas don't always have all their variables labelled, but on the other hand, the equations are numbered. What one gains from the brisk pace of the lectures - being able to follow along - is simultaneously its defect: difficulty in digesting it.

j
John_M
Aug 04, 2010

Feynman admits that the series of lectures that this book is based on was not an outstanding success. I did get a better understanding of relativity but still there were many questions left unanswered. I was particularly annoyed when the text referred to lectures that were not included in this book. This left gaps that were difficult to deal with.

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